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Vegetable Medley Soup

Soup is one that provides a powerful nourishment for the fall season. lots of veggies, tea and magical healing miso, how could one go wrong?

Vegetable Medley Soup:

  • 3-6 whole bell peppers, s-bladed
  • 1 bunch spinach, s-bladed
  • 1 bunch celery, 2mm-disk
  • 1-4 bunches cilantro , or basil s-bladed
  • 2-3 cups sundried tomatoes, soaked, s-bladed
  • 4 whole avocados, diced
  • 1 ½ cups pumpkin seeds, or hemp seeds, whole
  • ½ cup cumin
  • ½ cup olive oil, or sesame oil
  • ½ cup lemon juice, or 2 Tablespoons apple vinegar
  • ¼ cup kalamata black olive brine
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ tablespoon cayenne pepper
  • ½ teaspoon hing, or garlic
  • 1 cup miso
  • 4 cups nettle, dandelion, or rooibos tea

To make tea:

1/2 cup nettle, or dandelion or rooibos dry tea.

3 cups tea kettle watersteep for 20 minutes.

Miso, add enough miso till you like the taste. I like to use a gluten free miso from South River Miso, it makes Miso Happy! It is simply the best! (I will be putting in a bulk order soon so if you live in my area, let me know and I will order you some!)

Add all ingredients to a bowl and serve. You may choose to warm on stove till soup is warm to the touch or you may use a candy thermometer and heat to 120 degrees.

Note: When I say s-bladed it means to use the “S” shaped blade in your food processor to chop ingredients. Be careful not to process to much and puree it.  Just chop.

Nettles are used throughout the world to build vitality, nettles are delicious and if your in a moist area, free for the taking! But do take carefully! (Preferably with gloves) To harvest the leaf, you come at the leaf from the bottom, folding it along its central crease, yanking it gently from the mother plant, and then rolling it up so as to enclose the top of the leaf (where the stingers are most commonly found).
Nettles are persistent perennials that can grow taller than 2 meters (6 feet). Nettles grow in multiple thin stalks arising from the ground. Nettle leaves are typically collected, eaten and or dried in May and June, just before coming into flower. The stems and leaf tops of the stinging nettle plant are covered with thin, hair like protrusions. These protrusions, if touched, release a stinging fluid containing histamine and formic acid, which causes temporary burning and irritation. This injection, which is like and ant’s bite, increases circulation, and provides external treatment for arthritic pain, gout, sciatica, neuralgia, hemorrhoids, and scalp and heir problems. Nettle juice can be used as a hair rinse to restore natural color. Nettle extracts are used in many shampoos.
Internally, nettles are a kidney tonic with diuretic properties that help flush the blood and cleanse blood through the kidneys. Nettles afford allergy relief, enrich the blood, and thicken the hair. Due to their iron rich content and ease of absorption, nettle juice is more effective than spinach juice in building blood. Nettle leaves are highly alkaline. They neutralize and dissolve acidic wastes in the blood. Its power to purify the blood will do wonders for chronic skin ailments. Its effective against eczema on the upper body, especially on the face and neck, and ears. This benefit is likely due to its high silicon, chlorophyll, and vitamin C content.
Nettle juice is perfect for weight reduction. Nettles are also good for hypoglycemia, as they help reduce blood sugar levels, and they also ameliorate high blood pressure. Used for anemia and excessive menstruation, nettles also build overall energy and chi. Nettles reduce pitta and kapha and can be used, in moderation by vata. (If you know about ayurveda you know what Im talking about.)  Wow!
Stinging nettles probably originated in Eurasia, although there is some evidence that they were growing in the Americas when the Europeans arrived. Some of the strongest varieties grow in the United Kingdom and Germany.
Mythologically, the Nordics associated nettles with the thunder god Thor. Nettles were perceived to protect one from lightning. The incredible strengthening properties of the nettle plant really do make one more resistant to the elements.
When nettles are eaten, the saliva neutralizes the sting, so that one cannot be stung in the mouth or throat.
Mother nature provides her unique balance by providing a remedy for the nettle sting by allowing burdock to grow in the same locales as nettles. Mashed-up burdock leaves applied to the skin relieve nettle stings. Also the juice from the stinging nettle leaves acts as an antidote to the sting as well, when applied topically.
Simply and amazing plant!
 
Hope you all are having a wonderful fall!
Lots of hugs and blessings!
 
Michelle
 
PS. The information contained in this post came from the books, Eating for Beautyby David Wolfe, and The New Whole Foods Encyclopedia, by Rebecca Wood.
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Miso Happy!

I love miso from South River Miso Company, It is simply magical and they even have both soy-free and gluten-free varieties that are simply divine!
The 10 scientifically researched benefits of eating miso
  1. Contains all essential amino acids, making it a complete protein. This in turn helps preserve beautiful skin – miso contains linoleic acid, an essential fatty acid that helps your skin stay soft and free of pigments.
  2. Antiviral — Miso is very alkalizing and helps strengthen the immune system helping to combat viral infections.
  3. Restores beneficial probiotics to the intestines.
  4. Aids in digestion and assimilation of other foods in the intestines. This happens by stimulating the secretion of digestive fluids in the stomach.
  5. Helps maintain nutritional balance — full of nutrients beneficial bacteria and enzymes, miso provides protein vitamin B12, vitamin B2, vitamin E, vitamin K, tryptophan, choline, dietary fiber, linoleic acid and lecithin.
  6. Strengthens the quality of blood and lymph fluid.
  7. Reduces risk for breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers.
  8. Protects against radiation due to dipilocolonic acid, an alkaloid that chelates heavy metals and discharges them from the body.
  9. Strengthens the immune system and helps to lower LDL Cholesterol.
  10. Anti-Aging — high in antioxidants that protect against free radicals that cause signs of aging. Miso also helps reduce menopausal complaints because the isoflavones in the miso have been shown to reduce hot flashes.
As you can see, Miso is magical, it has a sweet, earthy, fruity, savory, and salty flavor that can be used in a variety of recipes.
Miso can be used as a dairy substitute in place of milk, butter and salt in creamed soups. Unpasteurized miso used in marinades tenderize meat and vegetables by helping to break down fibers. (I personally like it on asparagus). Use miso in a casserole or soup supplies plenty of high quality protein.
Sweet & Spicy Miso Soup:
  • 1 1/2 cups blessed water
  • 1 Tablespoon Miso (Today I used Garlic Red Pepper from South River Miso)
  • 1 Tablespoon Tahini
  • 1/2 medium onion, sauteed in a teaspoon of Garlic Red Pepper Miso & 1 teaspoon honey
  • Dash of cayenne
Sautee onion and any other veggies you desire. Heat water in pan. Add Miso and Tahini, stir. Add onion and dash of cayenne. Its also delicious with sea vegetables like cut up nori or wakame. Serve!

Many of you may notice that I use cayenne a lot. I do this because my body constitution is generally cold, and cayenne helps increase circulation. It is also known in many cultures to be a potent libido enhancing aid that increases euphoric endorphins in the blood stream. How exciting!
Cayenne is also relatively high in Vitamin A, vitamin B6, Vitamin C, riboflavin, potassium and manganese.
It’s snowing here in Whitefish, Montana today so I decided to make soup to keep me warm and toasty!
Miso Dressing:
  • 1/4 cup miso of your choice (My favorite is South River Miso)
  • Juice of one lemon
  • 1/2 cup high quality olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic (optional)
  • Dash of cayenne to taste (optional)
Blend in blender, serve! It is wonderful tossed in salad, garbanzos or quinoa.
Miso Aioli:

(This is adapted from the New York Times article Umami Dearest by Mark Bittman)

  • 2 Tablespoons Miso of your choice
  • 1 cup Veganaise
Stir miso into veganaise and use within 1 week. Dip yam fries, use on sandwiches, use as a sauce/dip for veggies.
Miso Butterscotch: (This is adapted from the New York Times article Umami Dearest by Mark Bittman)
  • 1/4 cup cashews (soaked)
  • 1/2 cup blessed water
  • 1/2 cup coconut oil, melted (I melt in my dehydrator but it can easily be done on the stove top on low heat)
  • 1/4 cup light miso (I used South River Miso’s Sweet White)
  • 3/4 cup coconut sugar
Blend soaked cashews and blessed water into a creamy mixture. Combine Cream, melted coconut oil, miso and coconut sugar in blender and blend until smooth. If  the sugar is not blending well, it might be helpful to place mixture in a saucepan on stove. Place on low heat and stir until sugar dissolves (probably about 5 or 10 minutes). Add more coconut sugar if needed or even a touch of maple syrup or honey for a truly rich flavor.
This mixture is delicious over poached pears and apples as well as cabbage, eggplant or even over a sorbet.
What is your favorite miso recipe???

Thank you for all of your support!

Love always,
Michelle

Hope you are all well and happy! There’s enough for everyone. If you believe it, if you can see it, if you act from it, it will show up for you. That’s the truth. ~Rev. Michael Beckwith